Storytelling

The art of storytelling is older than reading, dating back to long before printing was invented, but it is modern too.  The storyteller uses vocal variation, gestures, facial expression and physical movement to suggest different characters and character relationships in order to make the story come alive in the mind of the listener.  A presentation in this category is to be a narrative told in the third person.  Emphasis should be placed on a natural, spontaneous delivery given in the participant’s own words.  If the story does not lend itself to retelling in the student’s own words, it is not an appropriate selection. (Time: 4-8 minutes)

2011 Rule Change:  Storytellers may choose to sit or stand while telling their story, but they may not switch between sitting and standing as that would constitute using the chair as a prop.  Storytellers who choose to stand may move around freely when telling their story.

Link to Category Rules & Rubrics Page

 


Comments

Storytelling — 3 Comments

  1. If my student is doing “Storytelling” and they want to use the book If You Give a Pig a Pancake, would she have to change “you” and “your” to something else so that it is strictly third person, or is 2nd person ok as long as it is not 1st person?

    • In my opinion, the book titled If You Give a Pig a Pancake would better fit in the prose category. Perhaps your student could find a different story? Third person is typically the format desired for Storytelling.

    • Storytelling should sound spontaneous and not memorized. If the story does not lend itself to retelling in the student’s own words, it is not an appropriate selection. According to the rules the story must be told in the third person.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *